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HIPAA, HITECH & HIT Legal Issues, Developments and Other Pertinent Information Relating To The Creation, Use and Exchange of Electronic Health Records

HIPAA “Mega Rule”, Meet “Super BAA”: The CMS Data Use Agreement

Posted in Privacy & Security

The recent release of the HIPAA/HITECH “mega rule” or “omnibus rule” has given bloggers and lawyers like us plenty of topics for analysis and debate, as well as some tools with which to prod covered entities, business associates and subcontractors to put HIPAA/HITECH-compliant Business Associate Agreements (“BAAs”) in place. It’s also a reminder to read BAAs that are already in place, and to make sure the provisions accurately describe how and why protected health information (“PHI”) is to be created, received, maintained, and/or transmitted. 

If you are an entity that participates in the Medicare Shared Savings Program as a Medicare Accountable Care Organization (“ACO”), your ability to access patient data from Medicare depends on your having signed the CMS Data Use Agreement (the “Data Use Agreement”). Just as covered entities, business associates, and subcontractors should read and fully understand their BAAs, Medicare ACOs should make sure they are aware of several Data Use Agreement provisions that are more stringent than provisions typically included in a BAA and that may come as a surprise. Here are ten provisions from the Data Use Agreement worth reviewing, whether you are a Medicare ACO or any other business associate or subcontractor, as these may very well resurface in some form in the “Super BAA” of the future:

 

1.         CMS (the covered entity) retains ownership rights in the patient data furnished to the ACO.

 

2.         The ACO may only use the patient data for the purposes enumerated in the Data Use Agreement.

 

3.         The ACO may not grant access to the patient data except as authorized by CMS.

 

4.         The ACO agrees that, within the ACO and its agents, access to patient data will be limited to the minimum amount of data and minimum number of individuals necessary to achieve the stated purposes.

 

5.         The ACO will only retain the patient data (and any derivative data) for one year or until 30 days after the purpose specified in the Data Use Agreement is completed, whichever is earlier, and the ACO must destroy the data and send written certification of the destruction to CMS within 30 days.

 

6.         The ACO must establish administrative, technical, and physical safeguards that meet or exceed standards established by the Office of Management and Budget and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

 

7.         The ACO acknowledges that it is prohibited from using unsecured telecommunications, including the Internet, to transmit individually identifiable, bidder identifiable or deducible information derived from the patient files. 

 

8.         The ACO agrees not to disclose any information derived from the patient data, even if the information does not include direct identifiers, if the information can, by itself or in combination with other data, be used to deduce an individual’s identity.

 

9.         The ACO agrees to abide by CMS’s cell size suppression policy (which stipulates that no cell of 10 or less may be displayed).

 

And last, but certainly not least:

 

10.       The ACO agrees to report to CMS any breach of personally identifiable information from the CMS data file(s), loss of these data, or disclosure to an unauthorized person by telephone or email within one hour.

  

While the undertakings of a Medicare ACO and the terminology in the Data Use Agreement for protection of patient data may differ from those of covered entities, business associates and subcontractors and their BAAs under the HIPAA/HITECH regulations, they have many striking similarities and purposes.