HIPAA Business Associates

With the explosion of health data sifting through cutting-edge companies, industry stakeholders are left to wonder how wearable devices, wellness programs, health applications, and the like should be regulated.

Despite current belief, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”) does not regulate all health information. HIPAA regulates health information collected and retained by covered

Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) refers to algorithm tools that simulate human intelligence, mimic human actions, and can incorporate self-learning software. The benefits of AI tech can reduce spending, provide alternative treatment ideas, and improve patient experience, diagnosis, and outcome.

Consider virtual health assistants who deliver medication alerts and patient education, AI used to detect abnormalities in

Last May, around the time many schools let out for the summer, the Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) published guidance entitled “Direct Liability of Business Associates” (the “Guidance”), which focuses, not surprisingly, on OCR’s ability to take enforcement action directly against HIPAA business associates. I meant to write about this guidance before Memorial

HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR)’s April 3, 2019 cybersecurity newsletter highlights one of the more challenging cybersecurity vulnerabilities faced by covered entities and business associates.  OCR reminds covered entities (CEs) and business associates (BAs) that compliance with the HIPAA Security Rule can help, but stops a bit short of providing concrete guidance as to

Yesterday’s listserv announcement from the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) brought to mind this question. The post announces the agreement by a Florida company, Advanced Care Hospitalists PL (ACH), to pay $500,000 and adopt a “substantial corrective action plan”. The first alleged HIPAA violation? Patient

Kristen Marotta writes:

Many believe that educated millennials are choosing to work in urban, rather than rural areas, during their early career due to societal milestones being steadily pushed back and the professional opportunities and preferences of a young professional. Recent medical school graduates are a good example of this dichotomy. The shortage of

Many employers who offer wellness programs to their employees may not have considered compliance with HIPAA privacy, security and breach notification rules (collectively, “HIPAA Rules”), since they don’t think of their wellness programs as a group health plan. Part 1 of this post covered why most employee assistance programs (“EAPs”) are subject to the HIPAA

You may be surprised to learn that those “extra” benefits your company offers to its employees such as your employee assistance program (“EAP”) and wellness program likely are subject to the HIPAA privacy, security and breach notification rules (collectively, “HIPAA Rules”). Part 1 covers why most EAPs are subject to the HIPAA Rules. Part 2

This blog recently discussed tips for a covered entity (CE) in dealing with a HIPAA business associate (BA). Now, even though you have adopted all of the tips and more, in this dangerous and ever more complex data security world, one of your BAs suffers a breach and it becomes your responsibility as the