Yesterday’s listserv announcement from the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) brought to mind this question. The post announces the agreement by a Florida company, Advanced Care Hospitalists PL (ACH), to pay $500,000 and adopt a “substantial corrective action plan”. The first alleged HIPAA violation? Patient

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) went into effect on May 25, 2018. Whereas HIPAA applies to particular types or classes of data creators, recipients, maintainers or transmitters (U.S. covered entities and their business associates and subcontractors), GDPR applies much more generally – it applies to personal data itself. Granted, it doesn’t apply

Individuals who have received notice of a HIPAA breach are often offered free credit monitoring services for some period of time, particularly if the protected health information involved included social security numbers.  I have not (yet) received such a notice, but was concerned when I learned about the massive Equifax breach (see here to view

In some respects, HIPAA has had a design problem from its inception. HIPAA is well known today as the federal law that requires protection of individually identifiable health information (and, though lesser-known, individual access to health information), but privacy and security were practically after-thoughts when HIPAA was enacted back in 1996. HIPAA (the Health