This blog series has been following breaches of Protected Health Information (“PHI”) that have been reported on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) ever-lengthening parade list (the “HHS List”) of breaches of unsecured PHI affecting 500 or more individuals (the “List Breaches”).  As reported in a previous blog post in this series,

This blog series has been following breaches of Protected Health Information (“PHI”) that have been reported on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) ever-lengthening parade list (the “HHS List”) of breaches of unsecured PHI affecting 500 or more individuals (the “List Breaches”). Previous blog posts in this series discussed here and  here

Elizabeth Litten and Michael Kline write:

For the second time in less than 2 ½ years, the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (the “FSSA”) has suffered a large breach of protected health information (“PHI”) as the result of actions of a business associate (“BA”).  If I’m a resident of Indiana and a client

Tamarra Holmes writes:

In recent weeks, people all around the world were made aware of a secret U.S. government surveillance program that essentially collects massive amounts of data from the general public through electronic communication providers, such as Facebook, Skype, and Google. The existence of the program, known as PRISM, was leaked by a former

In January 2011 this blog series discussed here and here that the University of Rochester Medical Center (“URMC” or the “Medical Center”) became a marcher twice in 2010 in the parade of large Protected Health Information (“PHI”) security breaches.  The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) publishes a list (the “HHS List”), which

While the summaries of closed investigations posted on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services list of breaches of unsecured PHI affecting 500 or more individuals continue to provide highly useful information for covered entities, business associates and subcontractors relative to confronting PHI breaches, large and small, they must be analyzed with appropriate care and attention paid to changes brought about by the recently-published Omnibus Rule.
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Much has been written about the circumstances surrounding the agreement of Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (“MEEI”) to pay the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services the sum of $1.5 million to settle potential violations involving an alleged 2010 security breach of PHI under HIPAA. However, relatively little has been written that the 2010 breach was the second of what may be three significant PHI breaches experienced by MEEI within the last three years.
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