In some respects, HIPAA has had a design problem from its inception. HIPAA is well known today as the federal law that requires protection of individually identifiable health information (and, though lesser-known, individual access to health information), but privacy and security were practically after-thoughts when HIPAA was enacted back in 1996. HIPAA (the Health

Our partner Bill Maruca, who is the Editor and a frequent contributor to this blog, was recently interviewed by PracticeSuite as part of their Expert Interview program.  In the course of his interview, Bill discusses patient confidentiality, keeping records safe and private, and trends in the medical billing industry. 

One important recommendation by Bill

A study conducted by MGMA indicates most doctors surveyed who have implemented electronic record systems are satisfied or very satisfied, and many report increased productivity and reduced costs as those systems are optimized, according to Modern Healthcare.  The full MGMA study may be downloaded here (registration required).  This report is highly recommended reading.

The study, funded

This blog has been reporting on the effects on providers, insurers and others of the HIPAA/HITECH statutes and regulations that require public disclosure of breaches of unsecured Protected Health Information ("PHI"). While the greatest attention under HIPAA/HITECH has been on electronic health records ("EHR"), the increasing inventory of billions of hard copy pages

Pennsylvania, get ready for another acronym: "QUICKSTEPS" (Quality Improvement and Care for Kids through Electronic Programs).  This is the state’s new five-year pediatric EMR initiative, funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through the Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act, or CHIPRA. Using $10 million in federal grants, the state’s departments of