Since the early days of HIPAA, a steady trickle of misinterpretations, misunderstandings and half-truths have circulated informally both within the medical community and among the general public.  The prevalence of social media only amplifies the effect. For example, a meme currently making the rounds on Facebook suggests using HIPAA as a strategy for convincing a

(Part III continues Part I and Part II of this series on privacy of health information in the domestic relations context, which may be found here and here. Capitalized words not defined in this Part III shall have the meanings assigned in Part I or Part II.)

6. The situation can be further complicated

(Part I of this series on privacy of health information in the domestic relations context may be found here. Capitalized words not defined in this Part II shall have the meanings assigned in Part I.)

Tips on dealing with IHI Issues in the Domestic Relations Context

1. Whether an individual is in a stable

The November 2014 ruling in the Connecticut Supreme Court in the case of Byrne v. Avery Center for Obstetrics and Gynecology, P.C., — A.3d —-, 2014, WL 5507439 (2014) (the “Byrne case”) has been discussed in a number of posts on this blog, including those here and here. The main focus of such