On the sixth day of CCPA the California Senate Health Committee gave to me … a HIPAA carve-out.

AB 713, reported favorably by the California Senate Health Committee, would expand the exemption related to HIPAA and medical research.

Specific carve-outs:
  • De-identified PHI or medical information, provided that the business does not attempt nor actually re-identify

More than eleven years have passed since the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the agency responsible for the privacy of protected health information under HIPAA, and the U.S. Department of Education (DOE), the agency responsible for the privacy of student records under FERPA, issued joint guidance on the interplay between HIPAA and

“TMI” usually means “too much information”, but it was used aptly by the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) as an acronym for a covered entity that exposed protected health information (PHI) of more than 300,000 patients through an insecurely configured server. According to the April 5, 2019 Resolution Agreement, the covered entity, Touchstone Medical

If you are a covered entity health plan or clearinghouse, you may be among the nine (un)lucky entities randomly chosen this month for review into compliance with HIPAA’s Administrative Simplification rules governing electronic transactions, code sets, and unique identifiers.  According to an FAQ published in March, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), acting

HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR)’s April 3, 2019 cybersecurity newsletter highlights one of the more challenging cybersecurity vulnerabilities faced by covered entities and business associates.  OCR reminds covered entities (CEs) and business associates (BAs) that compliance with the HIPAA Security Rule can help, but stops a bit short of providing concrete guidance as to

Yesterday’s listserv announcement from the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) brought to mind this question. The post announces the agreement by a Florida company, Advanced Care Hospitalists PL (ACH), to pay $500,000 and adopt a “substantial corrective action plan”. The first alleged HIPAA violation? Patient