The New York City skyline, including the Empire State BuildingIn a post on February 28, Fox associate Kristen Marotta discussed the privacy and security issues arising from the growing use of telemedicine, particularly for mental health treatment. Now on the firm’s Physician Law blog, Kristen continues her discussion of telepsychiatry by diving into recent developments in New York State surrounding the innovative practice model. Kristen notes new funding from the New York Office of Mental Health to expand its use, and breaks down the OMH regulations that psychiatrists and physicians will need to consider before offering telepsychiatry services.

We invite you to read Kristen’s piece.

Kristen Marotta writes:

Many believe that educated millennials are choosing to work in urban, rather than rural areas, during their early career due to societal milestones being steadily pushed back and the professional opportunities and preferences of a young professional. Recent medical school graduates are a good example of this dichotomy. The shortage of physicians in rural areas is a well-known phenomenon. Over the years, locum tenens staffing has helped to soften the impact and, recently, so has telemedicine.

Illustration of stethoscope and mobile phone, symbolizing telemedicineThe growing prevalence of telemedicine around the country is an important consideration for new physicians as they decide where to settle down and establish their careers.  In New York, medical graduates should be aware that a $500,000 federal grant was given to New York State’s Office of Mental Health this month, February 2018 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development Distance Learning and Telemedicine program.  Using telemedicine to provide mental health services may be a productive and efficient way to deliver healthcare, not only because many mental health examinations would not have to be conducted in-person, but also because of the general shortage of psychiatrists and mental health providers to meet these patient needs. Now, medical graduates who would like to establish their lifestyle in a city can simultaneously care for patients living miles apart from them.

It is essential that health care providers engaging in telemedicine understand the implications of this practice model with respect to compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).  Providers rendering health care services via telemedicine should update and adjust their security risk assessments and HIPAA privacy and security policies and procedures, because protected health information is likely to be created in two separate locations (i.e., the location of the provider and the location of the patient).  Providers should also make sure that their (or their practice’s) Notice of Privacy Practices has been updated to reflect the provision of services via telemedicine, so that the patient has the opportunity to make an informed decision about engaging in this type of health care. Additionally, new business associate agreements may be required with telehealth vendors that do not meet the narrow “mere conduit” exception and any new parties who will have access to the individual’s protected health information as a result of the provision of services via telemedicine. In connection with these efforts, Providers should research and conduct due diligence on vendors to confirm that they understand the services model and are HIPAA-compliant.

As telemedicine emerges and gains more traction in health care, state laws and regulations will also be created and/or updated, and physicians will need to keep abreast of these changes. A good example of this is the State of New York, which has an entire section of mental health regulations dedicated to telepsychiatry. Stay tuned to Fox Rothschild’s Physician Law Blog for further updates on these specific New York regulations, as well as the developments in telemedicine.


Kristen A. Marotta is an associate in the firm’s Health Law Department, based in its New York office.

U.S. Representative Tim Murphy (R-PA) has been a vocal advocate for mental health reform for a number of years.  Part of his crusade is driven by his concern that the HIPAA privacy rule “routinely interferes with the timely and continuous flow of health information between health care providers, patients, and families, thereby impeding patient care, and in some cases, public safety.”  Congressman Murphy’s efforts have resulted in the inclusion in the recently-passed 21st Century Cures Act of a provision entitled “Compassionate Communications on HIPAA” targeted at improving understanding of what mental health information can be shared with family members and caregivers.

The 21st Century Cures Act streamlines the drug approval process, authorizes $4.8 billion in new health research funding, including $1.8 billion for Vice President Joe Biden’s “cancer moonshot” and $1.6 billion for brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, and provides grants to combat the opioid epidemic.

Of most interest to readers of this blog, the Act also calls for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to clarify the situations in which HIPAA permits health care professionals to communicate with caregivers of adults with a serious mental illness to facilitate treatment.  By December 13, 2017, the Secretary of HHS is required to issue guidance  regarding when such disclosures would require the patient’s consent; when the patient must be given an opportunity to object; when disclosures may be made based on the exercise of professional judgment regarding whether the patient would object when consent may not be obtained due to incapacity or emergency; and when disclosures may be made in the best interest of the patient when the patient is not present or is incapacitated.   HHS is directed to address communications to family members or other individuals involved in the care of the patient, including facilitating treatment and medication adherence.  Guidance is also required regarding communications when a patient presents a serious and imminent threat of harm to self or others.  HHS is directed to develop model training materials for healthcare providers, patients and their families.

The law incorporates the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration’s definition of the term “serious mental illness” as “a diagnosable mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder that results in serious functional impairment and substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.”

Importantly, the law neither changes existing regulatory exceptions under HIPAA nor directs HHS to modify them.  Instead, it calls for further explanation of existing rules that are often poorly understood by providers, patients and caregivers alike or may actually be used inappropriately to thwart the flow of meaningful and helpful information leading to barriers to effective communication that would benefit patients and improve mental health outcomes.

An existing public safety exception permits a covered entity to use or disclose PHI if the covered entity, in good faith, believes the use or disclosure is necessary to prevent or lessen a serious and imminent threat to the health or safety of a person or the public; and the disclosure is made to a person or persons reasonably able to prevent or lessen the threat, including the target of the threat.

The existing exception for caregivers permits disclosures to a family member, other relatives, or a close personal friend of the individual, or any other person identified by the individual, but only regarding PHI that is directly relevant to such person’s involvement with the individual’s health care or payment for care.

PHI may also be disclosed when the patient is present and provides consent, does not object to a disclosure of PHI to another individual accompanying them when given the opportunity to object, or where the covered entity reasonably infers from the circumstances, based on the exercise of professional judgment, that the patient does not object to the disclosure.

Other existing exceptions address emergency situations as well as cases where the patient is incapacitated, and permit disclosure of only the PHI that is directly relevant to the other person’s involvement with the patient’s care or payment.

The new law falls short of Rep. Murphy’s previous legislative proposals.  In 2015, Murphy introduced a bill entitled the Helping Families In Mental Health Crisis Act. which he said would “allow the doctor or mental health professional to provide the diagnosis, treatment plans, appointment scheduling, and prescription information to the family member and known caregiver for a patient with a serious mental illness. This change would apply for those who can benefit from care yet are unable to follow through on their own self-directed care.”   This bill was passed by the House by a wide margin but was not enacted.

While the new law does not expand HIPAA exceptions, it does make it more likely that those exceptions already on the books will be more clearly understood and implemented in cases involving serious mental illness.