More and more often, health care data is stolen or made inaccessible by targeted ransomware attacks. The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) published a newsletter this week that provides warnings for HIPAA covered entities and business associates. It also provides practical tips to prevent and help you survive these attacks.

OCR’s warnings should resonate with

A two-physician practice in Battle Creek, Michigan is reportedly the first health care provider to cease operations as a result of a ransomware attack.  The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports that Brookside ENT experienced a malware attack that deleted and overwrote every medical record, bill and appointment in the practice’s system, including backups, and created encrypted

Last week, I blogged about a recent U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Civil Rights (OCR) announcement on its push to investigate smaller breaches (those involving fewer than 500 individuals).   The week before that, my partner and fellow blogger Michael Kline wrote about OCR’s guidance on responding to cybersecurity incidents.  Today, TechRepublic

The following post was contributed by our colleague Lucy Li.

HIPAA itself does not provide a private right of action. So when a hacker or rogue employee impermissibly accesses or interferes with electronic data or data systems containing protected health information, an employer subject to HIPAA cannot sue the perpetrator under HIPAA.  Similarly, when

I received a disturbing robo-call over the weekend informing me that someone had attempted to use my credit card number fraudulently in a retail store in the next county. When I called back and verified these were not legitimate charges, my card issuer assured me that I would not be financially responsible, canceled my card